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Moore and Stephenson (no dates). American Library Association Twenty-first annual conference, Atlanta, Georgia, May 8-13, 1899. Courtesy http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/finearts

Are you exploring possible career paths?  Considering starting up a business of your own?  Looking for guidance on marketing your services as a private contractor?  Trade and professional associations are a useful resource in all of these circumstances.  They offer opportunities to learn about a career or business field, connect with other professionals, and benefit from special services provided to association members.

How do you find associations in your field?  A simple keyword Internet search (for example, paralegal associations) might be all you need.  On the other hand, there are advantages to using selective, published association directories, which can help you sort the well-established organizations from the fly-by-night groups.  Also, published directories offer the option of browsing, which can lead to new, creative ideas.  Maybe you didn’t know that there is an American Society of Indexing or a Biomass Power Association.  Browsing can lead a researcher down some interesting paths she hadn’t considered before.

The Brooks Memorial Library offers association-related material in print form and online.  Here’s a roundup of resources:

In print, on the Library’s shelves:

  • Encyclopedia of Careers & Vocational Guidance.  Ferguson Publishing, 2010.  REF 331.7 ENC.  We tend to call it “Ferguson’s” around the Library.  It’s a five-volume set of profiles of various career fields, including information on things like training, earnings potential, and typical work environments.  Each entry also includes contact information and website urls for trade and professional associations in that field.
  • Survey of American Industries and Careers.   Salem Press, 2012.  Hot off the press, and just reviewed by our own Jerry Carbone in the Booklist review journal.  It hasn’t even been cataloged yet, but you will find it soon in the Reference area near the Ferguson’s.  It updates and supplements Ferguson’s beautifully, so you’ll want to check both for information on your field, including information on associations.

Online, through the Library’s website (access from home with your card):

  • Business & Company Resource Center.  On the website, select Resources > Business.  Search for your field in the Industries section.  If you find a profile for your industry, look for the “Associations” tab on the far right of the screen.  It will bring up entries from published directories of national, international, and U.S. regional associations.
  • Small Business Resource Center On the website, select Resources > Business.  On the first screen, click on “Business Types,” choose your field of interest, and then click on the “Directories” tab.  It will link you to entries from business reference books, including roundups of trade and professional associations for small businesses of all kinds.

Online, free to all:

  • Associations on the Net, a special collection of the Internet Public Library.  www.ipl.org.  Click on “Special Collections Created by IPL2,” and then choose the Associations on the Net link under “Other Collections.”  Use the subject links on the left side of the screen to zero in on associations in your field.  All of them have subdivisions to get even more specific information; for example, “Health and Medical Sciences” includes 20 or so specific health-related fields, all with their own associations.
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook, from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  http://www.bls.gov/oco.  A free source that covers some of the same ground as Ferguson’s and the Survey of American Industry & Careers.  Includes links to trade and professional associations with a disclaimer that the links are for convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

May you find many rewarding associations!

JMW

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The Brooks Memorial Library, in conjunction with the University of Vermont’s Center for Digital Initatives and with funding from the Windham Foundation, is undergoing a project to scan and catalog the almost 1,300 photographic images made by local photographer Porter Thayer.

Porter Thayer was a photographer, born in Williamsville, Vermont,  who took photographs around Windham County from 1903 – 1930. Thayer used a 5×7 and a 6.5 x 8.5 view camera and  glass plate negatives to create his images. The detail available in his large format images creates an extraordinary glimpse into early 20th century life in Southeastern Vermont.

Currently, Porter Thayer’s images are only available to the public on microfilm, which maintains little of the beauty and detail of the original images. The vision and detail of Thayer’s work will be better preserved through digitization, as well as allowing these images to be more accessible to the local public, scholars of Vermont history and of early 20th century photography online free of charge.

The photographs are being scanned and cataloged by Jess Weitz, staff member at the Brooks Memorial Library, in batches of 50 images. The first set of images will be available online by the first week in December 2010. The database of images can be accessed through the Center for Digital Initatives site at http://cdi.uvm.edu/

The project staff hopes to gain feedback from individuals and local historical societies about their knowledge of the people and places in the images.. On each images page, there will be a place to submit comments and have your knowledge added to the image’s historic record.

Please join us for an afternoon talk about “The History of the Town Photographer”by local photographer Forrest Holzapfel, sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council, and a discussion of the Porter Thayer project to date, on January 15th at  3:00 PM in the Library’s meeting room.

For more information about the project, please contact Jess Weitz at jessica@brooks.lib.vt.us or Robin Katz (of the CDI) at robin.katz@uvm.edu .

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Tip: Summer is short. Gather your books NOW.

Here are some tools to get you started:

The Rapid Reviews list is compiled by four clever librarians who review them, rapidly, every year at the Vermont Library Conference. It’s usually a mix of well-known and lesser-known titles, and it’s always interesting.

Brooks Books is a cherry-red link at the top of the BML catalog screen. It takes you to lists compiled by staff members using fun themes like “Garden to Table” and “Travel Free: Armchairs Don’t Use Oil.” At the bottom, there are links to lists of award-winners for all ages and genres.

The Brooks Teen Blog has just posted the 2008-2009 master list for the Green Mountain Book Award. These are great selections for young adults and people who used to be young adults. The blog also features local reviews and links to other teen reading sites.

Windham County Reads, the organization that brings us the Bookmobile, produces summer reading lists for all ages. Scroll down to Resources to find the link, and while you’re there, read up on WCR’s important work of bringing families and books together.

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Brooks Memorial Library Reference Department:

Jeanne Walsh, Therese Marcy, Sharon Reidt, Jess Weitz, and sometimes Jerry