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Folks who are interested in the transition town discussion: we have multiple copies of The Transition Companion: Making Your Community More Resilient in Uncertain Times, by Rob Hopkins (Chelsea Green, 2011).  You’ll find it in the mezzanine under 307.14 HOP.  Time to start your book discussion group?

JMW

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Moore and Stephenson (no dates). American Library Association Twenty-first annual conference, Atlanta, Georgia, May 8-13, 1899. Courtesy http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/finearts

Are you exploring possible career paths?  Considering starting up a business of your own?  Looking for guidance on marketing your services as a private contractor?  Trade and professional associations are a useful resource in all of these circumstances.  They offer opportunities to learn about a career or business field, connect with other professionals, and benefit from special services provided to association members.

How do you find associations in your field?  A simple keyword Internet search (for example, paralegal associations) might be all you need.  On the other hand, there are advantages to using selective, published association directories, which can help you sort the well-established organizations from the fly-by-night groups.  Also, published directories offer the option of browsing, which can lead to new, creative ideas.  Maybe you didn’t know that there is an American Society of Indexing or a Biomass Power Association.  Browsing can lead a researcher down some interesting paths she hadn’t considered before.

The Brooks Memorial Library offers association-related material in print form and online.  Here’s a roundup of resources:

In print, on the Library’s shelves:

  • Encyclopedia of Careers & Vocational Guidance.  Ferguson Publishing, 2010.  REF 331.7 ENC.  We tend to call it “Ferguson’s” around the Library.  It’s a five-volume set of profiles of various career fields, including information on things like training, earnings potential, and typical work environments.  Each entry also includes contact information and website urls for trade and professional associations in that field.
  • Survey of American Industries and Careers.   Salem Press, 2012.  Hot off the press, and just reviewed by our own Jerry Carbone in the Booklist review journal.  It hasn’t even been cataloged yet, but you will find it soon in the Reference area near the Ferguson’s.  It updates and supplements Ferguson’s beautifully, so you’ll want to check both for information on your field, including information on associations.

Online, through the Library’s website (access from home with your card):

  • Business & Company Resource Center.  On the website, select Resources > Business.  Search for your field in the Industries section.  If you find a profile for your industry, look for the “Associations” tab on the far right of the screen.  It will bring up entries from published directories of national, international, and U.S. regional associations.
  • Small Business Resource Center On the website, select Resources > Business.  On the first screen, click on “Business Types,” choose your field of interest, and then click on the “Directories” tab.  It will link you to entries from business reference books, including roundups of trade and professional associations for small businesses of all kinds.

Online, free to all:

  • Associations on the Net, a special collection of the Internet Public Library.  www.ipl.org.  Click on “Special Collections Created by IPL2,” and then choose the Associations on the Net link under “Other Collections.”  Use the subject links on the left side of the screen to zero in on associations in your field.  All of them have subdivisions to get even more specific information; for example, “Health and Medical Sciences” includes 20 or so specific health-related fields, all with their own associations.
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook, from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  http://www.bls.gov/oco.  A free source that covers some of the same ground as Ferguson’s and the Survey of American Industry & Careers.  Includes links to trade and professional associations with a disclaimer that the links are for convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

May you find many rewarding associations!

JMW

For up-to-date health research, Brooks Memorial offers the Health & Wellness Resource Center, an excellent general health database that is updated continuously.  But circulation statistics show that many of us also like to turn to books for health information.  Thanks to a generous grant from the Crosby Foundation, the Library was able to add approximately 60 new titles to its health collection in 2010. We will be highlighting a few of the new health titles by subject in upcoming blog posts.

Here are a few of the mental health books to look for on our shelves, followed by their call numbers:

Freeman, Daniel, Jason Freeman. Know your mind : the complete family reference guide to emotional health . New York, NY : Sterling Pub., 2010.  Addressing everything from addictions, bereavement, pain, and anxiety to sleep disorders, mood swings, depression, and stress, Know Your Mindeven features tools for self-evaluation, personal stories, and exercises. 616.89 FRE

Honos-Webb, Lara. The gift of ADHD : how to transform your child’s problems into strengths. Oakland, CA : New Harbinger Publications, c2010.  In it’s second edition, Lara Honos-Webb offers strategies for shifting parents’ understanding of their child’s attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to focus on the positive traits of this diagnosis by providing step-by-step behavioral exercises for helping children function effectively. 618.92 HON

Miklowitz, David Jay. The bipolar disorder survival guide : what you and your family need to know. New York : Guilford Press, c2011.  A practical, straightforward book that will be a great help to those who have bipolar illness, as well as their families 616.89 MIK

Phillips, Suzanne, Dianne Kane. Healing together : a couple’s guide to coping with trauma & post-traumatic stress. Oakland, CA : New Harbinger Publications, c2008.   This book is for people in relationships where either partner has faced trauma in any of its forms: violence, natural disasters, war, life-threatening accidents, crime, health problems, or loss of a loved one. 616.89 PHI


For up-to-date health research, Brooks Memorial offers the Health & Wellness Resource Center, an excellent general health database that is updated continuously.  But circulation statistics show that many of us also like to turn to books for health information.  Thanks to a generous grant from the Crosby Foundation, the Library was able to add approximately 60 new titles to its health collection in 2010. We will be highlighting a few of the new health titles by subject in upcoming blog posts.

Here are a few of the general health books to look for on our shelves, followed by their call numbers:

A family guide to first aid and emergency preparedness (DVD). Yardley, Pa.: Staywell, c2008. A booklet and DVD by the American Red Cross covering illness and injury first aid. 616.02 FAM

Goldstein, Mark, Myrna Chandler Goldstein, and Larry P. Credit. Your best medicine: from conventional and complementary medicine-expert-endorsed therapeutic solutions to relieve symptoms and speed healing. Emmaus, Pa.: Rodale, c2008. An excellent introduction to integrative medicine, organized alphabetically by ailments. 613 GOL

Mayo Clinic family health book. Des Moines, IA: Time Inc. Home Entertainment, c2009.A reliable single volume covering health concerns from infancy to old age. Chapters include: Injuries and Symptoms; Pregnancy and Healthy Children; Healthy Adults; Diseases and Disorders; and Tests and Treatments. 613 MAY and  REF 613 MAY

Spinelli, Frank. The Advocate guide to gay men’s health and wellness. New York: Alyson Books, 2008.  A top-selling gay and lesbian news magazine provides a guide to health issues specific to gay men’s lives. 613.086 SPI

For a complete bibliography of all the new health titles Brooks Memorial Library has purchased under the Crosby grant, please ask at the reference desk.

For up-to-date health research, Brooks Memorial offers the Health & Wellness Resource Center, an excellent general health database that is updated continuously.  But circulation statistics show that many of us also like to turn to books for health information.  Thanks to a generous grant from the Crosby Foundation, the Library was able to add approximately 60 new titles to its health collection in 2010. We will be highlighting a few of the new health titles by subject in upcoming blog posts.

Here are a few of the diseases and specific health concerns books to look for on our shelves, followed by their call numbers. We have chosen single titles from the major categories of disease to highlight. To see all the titles in a specific category please request our new health book bibliography at the reference desk.

Bonner, Dede. The 10 best questions for living with Alzheimer’s. New York : Simon & Schuster, c2008.    An excellent title to help a family move past a scary diagnosis and use the power of questions to become your own best health advocate. 616.8 BON

Diabetes A to Z : what you need to know about diabetes simply put. The American Diabetes Association, Alexandria, Va.: American Diabetes Association, c2010.  In this updated 6th edition, get all the information you need-from understanding A1C to getting your ZZZs. 616.4 DIA

Rosenthal, M. Sara. The thyroid sourcebook. New York : McGraw-Hill, c2009. Providing information on the complications of hypo- and hyperthyroidism, thyroid eye disease, and thyroid cancer, through personal narratives and medical information. 616.4 ROS

Scardino, Peter T., Judith Kelman. Dr. Peter Scardino’s prostate book : the complete guide to overcoming prostate cancer, prostatitis, and bph. New York : Avery, c2010.  One in six men in the United States will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and nearly half the adult male population will be affected by prostatitis. Scardino’s Prostate book provides the facts and a compassionate voice to guide every man to health and healing. 616.99 SCA

Wallack, Marc K., Jamie Colby with Alisa Bowman. Back to life after a heart crisis : a doctor and his wife share their 8-step cardiac comeback plan. New York: Penguin, c2010.  Surgical oncologist Wallack discovered how frightening the patient’s side of the bed looks when he requires emergency quadruple bypass surgery. Emotional support for all the life milestones after heart surgery.  616.1 WAL


For up-to-date health research, Brooks Memorial offers the Health & Wellness Resource Center, an excellent general health database that is updated continuously.  But circulation statistics show that many of us also like to turn to books for health information.  Thanks to a generous grant from the Crosby Foundation, the Library was able to add approximately 60 new titles to its health collection in 2010. We will be highlighting a few of the new health titles by subject in upcoming blog posts.

Here are a few of the women’s health books to look for on our shelves, followed by their call numbers:

Crawford, Amanda McQuade. The natural menopause handbook, revised : herbs, nutrition & other natural therapies. Berkeley : Crossing Press, c2009.  This title supports the belief that menopause is a natural process and one that does not necessarily require medication. This revised edition focuses on herbs, nutrition exercise, aromatherapy, and visualization to create a holistic plan for wellness. 618.1 CRA

Eldridge, Laura. In our control : the complete guide to contraceptive choices for women. New York, NY : Seven Stories Press, c2010.  Marking  the 50th anniversary of the pill, Eldridge’s book examines the strengths and weaknesses of women’s birth control choices, as well as the history of contraception. 613.9 ELD

Northrup, Christiane. Women’s bodies, women’s wisdom : creating physical and emotional health and healing. New York : Bantam Books, c2010. First published in 1994, this revised edition describes itself as “a behind-the-scenes tour of the female body, showing you how to truly thrive and flourish” by longtime women’s health advocate Northrup. 618.1 NOR


For up-to-date health research, Brooks Memorial offers the Health & Wellness Resource Center, an excellent general health database that is updated continuously.  But circulation statistics show that many of us also like to turn to books for health information.  Thanks to a generous grant from the Crosby Foundation, the Library was able to add approximately 60 new titles to its health collection in 2010. We will be highlighting a few of the new health titles by subject in upcoming blog posts.

Here are a few of the alternative health books to look for on our shelves, followed by their call numbers:

Christensen, Alice. The American yoga association’s beginner’s manual. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002. An essential step-by-step guide provides students with the information and guidance they need to learn Yoga safely and effectively. 613.7 CHR

Hicks, Angela, John Hicks, Peter Mole. Five element constitutional acupuncture. Edinburgh : Churchill Li vingstone, 2010. An introduction to the philosophy and practice of acupuncture.      615.8 HIC

Mayo Clinic book of alternative medicine. New York : Time Inc. Home Entertainment, c2007.  An illustrated guide to understanding what works and what doesn’t in complementary and alternative medicine, and how to put this information to use in your everyday life. The topics range from practices such as yoga to supplements such as Echinacea and St. John’s Wort. 615.5 MAY

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Brooks Memorial Library Reference Department:

Jeanne Walsh, Therese Marcy, Sharon Reidt, Jess Weitz, and sometimes Jerry